Greening the City: images of parks and plants, 1925-45

Are you looking for inspiration? There’s a new exhibition of London Transport posters outside the Art & Design Archives on the ground floor of BCU's Parkside building that may give you ideas for your own work.

Walter Spradbery, Fragrance: Honeysuckle, London Transport poster, 1936,  Birmingham City University Art & Design Archives, SA/SM/4/1/260.

Walter Spradbery, Fragrance: Honeysuckle, London Transport poster, 1936,  Birmingham City University Art & Design Archives, SA/SM/4/1/260.

During the 1920s and 1930s, London Transport had a well-founded reputation for the quality of its advertising.  Their publicity manager, Frank Pick, was an important patron of contemporary art who sought to promote parks as offering a peaceful retreat from the bustle of city life. There are more than 5,000 acres of historic parkland in London, including eight Royal Parks. Each park has its own unique history and character, which is reflected in posters such as Charles Paine’s images of Hampton Court (1921) and the deer in Richmond Park (1925);  and Henry Perry’s Chestnut Sunday at Bushy Park (1935).  The exhibition also includes an eye-catching poster by Edward McKnight Kauffner entitled Spring (1937)  and others promoting London's public gardens. The subject lent itself to bright, vibrant and eye-catching designs, many of which publicized seasonal blooms.

This display shows just a small sample of the artworks that we currently hold. If you’d like to see more, why not visit the Archives?