Glasgow School of Art launches new website

Congratulations to Glasgow School of Art on the launch of their new website and on-line catalogue. In making their collections more accessible on-line, they are hoping to promote their use by larger numbers of GSA staff and students.

Still life class in the Mackintosh Room, c.1910.

Still life class in the Mackintosh Room, c.1910.

Dorothy Campbell Smith, Embroidery entitled 'Peace be with you', c.1940-45.

Dorothy Campbell Smith, Embroidery entitled 'Peace be with you', c.1940-45.

With that aim in mind, they have tried to ensure that the catalogue is as user-friendly as possible, particularly for the creative artists and designers who make up a significant proportion of their users. Wherever possible, they have included images alongside their catalogue entries, opening up a treasure trove of items to the public. Why not take a look at some of them by clicking on one of the eight categories on their homepage?

You’ll see that the resources section of the website include a page of nine case studies that give examples of students, academic researchers and practising artists and designers using the GSA Archives in developing their own work. 

Floor plans showing the Mackintosh Building transformed for the Belgian Tryst in 1914

Floor plans showing the Mackintosh Building transformed for the Belgian Tryst in 1914

Of particular interest to me in view of our work with artist-in-residence Justin Wiggan on Birmingham School of Art’s experience of World War I was the case study by first year Product Design student Jade Richardson, who was given a brief to develop a product that would commemorate the First World War centenary in a more personal way. During the course of her research in the Archives, she became interested in the broader history of the School and developed an app which could be used by students and visitors alike to explore the history of the Mackintosh building. Why not take a closer look at her reflective journal?

As we’re currently looking at the possibility of developing our own on-line catalogue, it’d be great to have your comments on how easy you find the GSA website to use – or indeed any other on-line archive catalogues you've looked at.